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TODAY'S OTHER NEWS

Notice periods extended with a view to ‘supporting renters over winter’

Buy-to-let landlords in England will now have to give tenants six months’ notice to vacate their property except in cases involving anti-social behaviour and domestic abuse, until “at least the end of March”. 

The government made the announcement on Friday when it also confirmed that the ban on possession proceedings in England and Wales will be extended until 20 September.

A landlord in England can now only ask a tenant to leave during the fixed term if they have certain reasons (‘grounds’) to do so, including if tenants are behind with their rent payments (‘in arrears’), renters have used the property for illegal purposes, such as selling drugs, or if they have seriously damaged the property.

Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick said: “I know this year has been challenging and all of us are still living with the effects of Covid-19. That is why I am announcing a further four-week ban on evictions, meaning no renters will have been evicted for six months.

“I am also increasing protections for renters – six-month notice periods must be given to tenants, supporting renters over winter.

“However it is right that the most egregious cases, for example those involving anti-social behaviour or domestic abuse perpetrators, begin to be heard in court again. So when courts reopen, landlords will once again be able to progress these priority cases.”

 

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    Has reality hit home yet ?

    It can often be difficult to discern the truth amongst all of the many dogs barking.

    Simon D

    what does that mean? can you explain a little more please.

     
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    Please don't encourage him. His posts are a waste of time and he doesn't understand the real consequences of all the anti landlord sentiment and behavior which actually harms the most vulnerable tenants the most - like all loony leftie philosophies do in practice - but their supporters are too thick to see that.

     
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    I shall be issuing 6 month notice period every time a new renter moves, just in case I want them to leave after 6 months.

    John Cart

    So that's a ten month tenancy in effect as you can't issue any notice in the first four months of a six month AST.

     
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    Great idea......

     
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    Government should cover all tenants rent arrears.

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    Including rent already NOT paid........not just future non payments

     
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    It is interesting as s21 notice only has a 6 month shelf life, so if the notice period is 6 months, it will become invalid the second you can use it. I think at present you can still technically give a 3 month notice as the legislation has not yet been introduced - it probably won’t result in possession though as no doubt more laws will be passed in due course. I think the government need to offer more financial support for tenants so that most evictions become unnecessary, rather than storing up problems for landlords and tenants down the road.

  • Neil Moores

    "A landlord in England can now only ask a tenant to leave during the fixed term if they have certain reasons (‘grounds’) to do so, including if tenants are behind with their rent payments (‘in arrears’), renters have used the property for illegal purposes, such as selling drugs, or if they have seriously damaged the property." When was this ever different? It has always been the case that a property owner cannot ask their tenant to leave during the fixed term.

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    But the tenant CAN ask for a release with a 1 month notice as I understand it.

    I think you as a landlord can also ask the tenant to leave if YOU need the house back for your personal use.
    I think then you have to live in it for at least 2 years before you can start renting again.

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    What a mess the landlords have to deal with. So much uncertainty
    I was due to issue a three months s21 notice and now it has to be 6 months
    What happens to those who have recently issued s21 three months’ notices. Have they become invalid?
    Can someone respond to the question?

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    • 25 August 2020 16:54 PM

    There seems to be some confusion on S21.
    All that has happened is rather than 2 months notice being required BEFORE a PO may be applied for now it is 6 months.
    The LL then has 6 months to initiate any legal action to evict.
    If nothing happens then after 6 months after a 6 month S21 notice the notice fails.
    A LL would then need to wait another 6 months.

    So for safety's sake a LL should issue a S21 every 6 months whether or not they intend to use it.
    This would only work if the TA was an SPT or CPT.
    If it was a New FTT then a S21 may only be issued at the last 2 months of the FTT.

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