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Amazing sentence - Curfew imposed on landlord in harassment case

A city council has prosecuted a landlord who has now been placed under an overnight curfew in her home and ordered to pay thousands in compensation and costs.

The landlord, Juliet Matorerwa, pleaded guilty to unlawfully evicting her lodger, in a case brought by Bristol council’s Rogue Landlord Unit. 

Matorerwa has been ordered to remain in her home between 8pm and 6am each night for the next three months after admitting illegally evicting the lodger under the Protection from Eviction Act 1977, which makes the harassment and unlawful eviction of a residential occupier a criminal offence. 

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The landlord let a spare room in her home to a lodger on a fixed-term agreement for six months in 2019. Following a breakdown in their relationship, a Bristol court heard that Matorerwa harassed the lodger, culminating in the eviction in October 2019 before their contractual agreement came to an end.

The council describes the lodger as “vulnerable and pregnant” and “effectively homeless.”

 

 

Passing sentence the judge, HHJ Hart, told Matorerwa: “You behaved in an inappropriate way towards her and evicted her 11 days prior to the date in which her occupation was due to end.  The way in which it happened was wholly unacceptable. This case demonstrates that the city council in Bristol will take people’s housing rights seriously regardless of whether there is a long-standing tenant or short-term lodger.  Such rights should not be interfered with.” 

The landlord must also pay almost £7,000 in compensation and costs.

A council spokesperson adds: "The message to all residential landlords in Bristol is, your lodgers do have rights. You need to follow the correct legal procedure for any eviction. If not, our officers will, if appropriate, take enforcement action to ensure tenants’ rights are upheld.’’

Want to comment on this story? If so...if any post is considered to victimise, harass, degrade or intimidate an individual or group of individuals on any basis, then the post may be deleted and the individual immediately banned from posting in future.

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    That word again, ''VULNERABLE''.

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    Tenants this, tenants that...poor little tenants.

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    11 days before the the contract was due to end? Was she refusing to move out? There's always two sides to every story.

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    And the rights of the person who lets someone into their home? There is more to this and my comments are based just on the article. If it was me and I was faced with a £7k bill it would be cheaper to appeal and get some rights for the landlord who doesn't want this person living in her home in spite of naively giving someone a fixed term contract. It is what it is and this should raise the point that you shouldn’t be able to enforce a fixed term in your own home. The protection from eviction act also makes this an excluded tenant from the act. It was designed to protect the landlord not the tenant. Isn’t harassment a separate issue? Just because they happen to be landlord and lodger? After giving notice the landlord could have changed the locks while the tenant was out. Isn’t that harsh yet legal? Raising the issue as to whether it is just to be enforced to make such a contract of a fixed term in your home.

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    The grubby landlords have come out to comment above. Can see from the comments we have some nasty little people who feel tenants are there to be milked.

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    No Daniel tenants are not there to be milked as you put it.

     
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    Some nasty little landlords who take on a lodger and have reduced rights in their own home. This is not about your average everyday nasty little landlord this is about someone in your own home.

     
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    What a orrible little man you are.
    A "tenant" in your own home you live in and you can't get her to leave because its what you want!. Listen little twit,
    She has probably done her a favour, she might have a council property now which the likes of you and us are paying her rent, but I doubt if you are because i wager you are one of lifes bums and scrounge every benefit going. Now go and join your mates in Shelter.

     
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    Presumably the landlord was not aware that she could simply have asked the tenant to leave and then called the police on her as a trespasser if she refused? In any case, it's bizarre that she didn't just wait another 11 days until the contract was completed, so clearly there must have been an extremely stressful situation. This, as already pointed out, is why lodgers do not have the same rights as with a standard rental.

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    I wonder if they have a rogue tenant unit for the grubby little tenants .

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    I have some sympathy for her if she is vulnerable but at the same time it’s the owners house. How well she managed to get pregnant and where is the father of the child, is he not in prison taking advantage of a vulnerable lady. Where are her Parents where is their support, ok the Council picks up the tab for her and the child probably for rest of their lives, we pay and get fined if we say anything against them.

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    IF she is vulnerable, a big IF, this is a term used all too often , as for pregnant it takes 2 to tango, I fully expect the pregnancy is all too convenient so she can milk the tax payer and get a free council house.

  • PossessionFriendUK PossessionFriend

    More and MORE Landlords are insisting on a ( Unlimited ) Guarantor, whether that be the Local Authority or other appropriate person.
    Ultimately, it will be tenants in most need who will suffer from measures landlords will have to adopt to protect themselves from the 5% of ' Scallies '

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