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Ros Beck
Landlord
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Landlord

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Ros Beck
Yes, there is a lot of flawed work coming out of the Cambridge Centre, commissioned by the JRF. The main problem is usually the whole concept - and it goes downhill from there. Earlier in the year, these two collaborated on a study with the idea of us learning lessons from how the private rented sector in the Republic of Ireland. The basic assumption behind the whole report was that this was a model we should emulate. In fact, my impression of the Irish private rented sector is that it is a shambles and reminiscent of '70s Britain, with poor quality housing and very conflictual landlord-tenant relations. Similarly, with this report, the whole concept was wrong - based on only looking at the private rented sector, and not the social sector - where evictions are at a similar rate - and assuming that 'no fault' eviction is the equivalent to landlords evicting without any reason when we evict for the same reason as the social sector (usually 'crap tenants'). We all know that Section 21 is used because it is a faster and more reliable way of getting rogue tenants out and minimising our huge losses at the hands of these criminals. In the eyes of Generation Rent, Shelter and now Shelter Mark 2 (the JRF will now follow Campbell Robb's anti-private landlord obsession/vendetta) rogue tenants are 'vulnerable' tenants, whom we 'turf out' for no reason. As if we would evict good tenants when change of tenancies, legal action and voids cost us money. It makes no sense. They also, in the report, call them '2 month' notice periods - when we also all know that the average is closer to 6 months. They are only 'theoretically 2 months' but 'actually 6 months.' These destructive reports based on anti-private landlord sentiment continue like a juggernaut damaging the PRS. If they carry on like this, we will be like the Irish setup and God help the decent tenants and the decent landlords - both of whom are in the majority and both of whom will be hammered by all this destructive policy-making.

From: Ros Beck 26 July 2017 17:06 PM

Ros Beck
Brit Sixteen Sixty Four: By 'professional landlords' do you mean the institutional ones which, for example, in the student market, charge three or four times what traditional landlords charge? On the one hand you want low rents and on the other you imply you prefer those who charge much higher rents. And you call the sector that charges lower rents 'greedy gearing speculators.' You don't make sense. As for saying landlords put rents up when interest rates have been at record low rates, many of us didn't, actually. Again, you don't know what you're talking about. Rents are really low in loads of parts of the country. Or are we to all agree that certain parts of London are the centre of the universe and all policy and debate should take this as their starting point? Also, if landlords sell to owner-occupiers (unlikely in many areas as people don't meet the mortgage lenders' criteria, don't want to buy and so on), then that house IS lost to the rental market. What or who will replace that rented house? As landlords who have not put the rent up - I have had one tenant paying £325 for 11 years and never put the rent up - why do you think we can't? The risk of voids isn't high in many areas as demand is so high. Also, if it weren't for the BTL model of leveraging - often at about 85% LTV in the past - (compared to owner-occupiers of 95%) - there would be an even worse shortage of rented housing now. Cash buyers or accidental landlords wouldn't be able to expand housing to anything like the same degree. Borrowing finance in business is normal. Do you think finance should be banned for all business or just that BTL mortgages should be made illegal? You say it's risky to borrow to buy houses, but that is the way people buy houses in this country. Should all mortgage lending be banned maybe? The points you make are highly contradictory and if followed would lead to a much worse housing crisis.

From: Ros Beck 03 November 2016 12:08 PM

Ros Beck

From: Ros Beck 16 September 2016 15:58 PM

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